Tales: Bloganuary (Leaving my Comfort Zone for Friends)

The prompt for day three of Bloganuary is “Write about the last time you left your comfort zone.”

I have been leaving my comfort zone for most of my life. As a young adult, I learned that in order to navigate the world, I frequently had to experience varying levels of awkwardness and vulnerability. At 18-years of age, I left my home and moved to a new country; I then went on to join the armed services, and from there, I had to travel to countries and interact with people from different cultures. As a result, I was forced to do things like repelling from a 50 foot tower backward, traveling to war zones, accepting rides from strangers under dier circumstances, and having to face scrutiny head-on. Every step I took away from my childish gaze forced me into uncomfortable situations that I would rather run away from.

If I think long and hard enough, I could come up with at least four dozen “leaving my comfort zone” moments. But, before I share my story, it’s best to define what it means to leave one’s comfort zone. The phrase is commonly used when a situation or activity forces a person to feel insecure, out of control, vulnerable, uncomfortable, and a bit displaced from their norm. 

While dangerous, shameful, or embarrassing situations all fall into this category. A few of the painful moments of stepping out of my comfort zone had to do with relationships. A few were romantic, but most were friendships that ended poorly. It is never a joyous moment when you realize a person you once called a friend doesn’t consider you as such. Whether their intentions were planned or random, confronting a friend never feels comfortable.

                                                                                                    Confronations that forces you out of your comfort zone

 

I have recently cut ties with a friend I have known since 2018. While for some, that’s not a long enough time to consider someone a close friend. I thought we were friends due to our shared experiences. By the end of this friendship, I had analyzed many of our issues and wanted to discuss the matter to resolve them. However, even with the most sincere intent, I read the body language and recognized how unmoved by my revelations this person had become. It was then I decided we weren’t actually friends after all. Instead, we were merely acquaintances, former co-workers, and just two people who used to know each other. 

As sad as this can be, the overall activity of confronting a friend is awkward, uncomfortable, and leaves you feeling out of control. However brave people like to make me out to be, I’m not too fond of confrontations.

Ultimately this is part of leaving my comfort zone that I dread.